More than 2.2 million British voters may have been left out of the postal survey of the general election in 2016, the Electoral Commission has found.

It is one of a number of problems that emerged during the campaign that have led to the findings.

The findings come from the EC’s annual survey of 1.2m voters in the UK and the EU.

They show that a third of the 1.6 million voters who participated in the EU referendum are not included in the official survey.

This is because of a lack of space on postal ballots.

“It is an indication that many people who did not vote in the European Union referendum have not yet received a ballot or voted in person,” the commission said in a statement.

In a separate report released last week, the commission estimated that the number of non-EU citizens living in the country without permission from the Home Office could reach up to 40% of the population. “

This means that about 2.1 million people are not in the electoral register.”

In a separate report released last week, the commission estimated that the number of non-EU citizens living in the country without permission from the Home Office could reach up to 40% of the population.

The commission said it had already been trying to get more information from Home Office officials and urged those authorities to act to ensure that “all those in the community who do not have permission to vote are able to participate in the postal vote”.

The commission’s analysis of the 2016 general election also found that the turnout among non-UK residents in the general elections was lower than in previous elections, although it did not specify why.

There were 5.4 million votes cast by non-residents in the overall vote, compared with 8.3 million votes for the national vote.

About 1.3m non-resident voters are believed to have voted in the election.

The results from the survey show that there was a significant decline in turnout among UK citizens living outside the UK.

In 2016, those who were British citizens were nearly twice as likely to vote as those who had not been born in the British Isles.

However, the proportion of non – UK citizens who voted was higher among those born in Britain.

The figure is a sharp departure from the 2016 election, when only 1.8% of non UK residents voted.

The EC said the drop in turnout in 2016 could be due to fewer voters being registered to vote and more people voting at home.

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